Top 5 Wednesday: Favorite Underrated Books

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Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Sam from Thoughts on Tomes and created by Lainey from Gingerreadlainey.

This post was a little tricky to write because Top Ten Tuesday had the same topic last week. It’s always fun talking about the popular books because there tends to be a larger group of people to talk with, but what about the books that don’t get the same attention?

While the post I did last week was focused mainly on young adult books, I thought that this week I would go over the five children’s books that are my favorite that I  think deserve more attention, even if they are a bit on the “classic” side.

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The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf

Goodreads

I remember this story being one of the books read to me the most as a child. I felt so bad for Ferdinand, being taken from his home when all he wanted to do was relax and smell the flowers. I’m glad this has a happy ending.

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The Story of Ping by Marjorie Flack

Goodreads

This one was passed down to me from my aunt and was read to me a lot by my grandmother and great-grandmother. I liked ducklings a lot and for a period of time as a very young child, I thought all baby animals were -ings: pig-lings, duck-lings, etc. It was funny and weird at the same time.

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Bread and Jam for Frances by Russell Hoban

Goodreads

I loved all the talk about food in this book. Even though Frances loves her bread and jam in the beginning, her mum and dad try to get her to try all sorts of things and by the end she’s open to new possibilities. I’m sure that I begged more than once for a recreation of a meal from this book.

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Strega Nona by Tomie de Paola

Goodreads

A nice book to read right before Italian night at home! It was funny to imagine the endless supply of spaghetti that could come from Stega Nona’s pot and poor Anthony’s foolish wish to use it without her help.

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Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans

Goodreads

This was one of the first stories I remember hearing about France. It has beautiful images drawn for the book and the opening line is one of the few that I actually remember of all the children’s books listed here:

“In an old house in Paris that was covered with vines,

Lived twelve little girls in two straight lines.”

All pictures, quotes, and videos belong to their respective owners. I use them here solely for the purpose of review and commentary.

 

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4 thoughts on “Top 5 Wednesday: Favorite Underrated Books

  1. AHHH I actually remember reading 4 of these as a kid and loving them!! Madeline was just like a staple love in our house and we loved the cartoon show and the live-action movie too. I wouldn’t have actually considered that one underrated until now…come to think of it, I never even see it at our library or anything?!? Travesty.😜 And I used to love Ping hehe!

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    1. I forgot there was a live action movie! I wonder if our library has it. I think I’m noticing these are underrated these days because my son and/or his friends never talk about them with the slight exception of George. He’s not one of the most popular characters, but I think I’m getting my son to like him (he certainly likes the cartoon!).

      Are there any Australian children’s books that you think should be more well know around the world?

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    1. I don’t remember many of her adventures beyond the one either, to be honest. *lol* There was a major one where she had to have her appendix out and she had to be brave, etc. I just realized I never questioned why these little girls were all living together, but I guess it was the first boarding school book I ever read?

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